(This is the seventh part, be sure to read the intro to this project in this blog).

#7 BACK TO WORK

It has been some time since I last worked on Boneeaters. I’m trying to get comfortable with this new "non-obsessive" approach to story writing. It’s alien to me, but important I do it. For me, since writing is an unfunded hobby not a job, I have to learn to work on it when it fits my life. And DarkBrain does represent one of the most out of control runs I’ve had in my "hobby career" which I’m learning to peel back from. I have approached nearly every major project in my life with obsessive focus, so… well, this is just weird.

This blog is just a reset for me to get ready to do another push at writing – or "outlining" would be more accurate. Because when I’m done with this phase we will have an outline, but not a story. The "real writing" can then begin on the story. However, it is interesting to note that a good chunk of what sucks in our current storytelling mediums is the outline, the backbone.

For example, I just watched Assassin’s Creed the movie and was struck with how hard the movie tried – it had great mood, reasonable story (on the edge of silly, but kept inside), really stellar action, and decent enough acting. But then at the end it fell off the cliff, jumped the shark, and just lazily decided to be over with a mind-numbingly dumb finish. It was horrifying to waste such effort. And the faults could have (and should have) been fixed before writing even started. It was just sad.

And that’s not an atypical deal. Some films can get away with a lackluster ending (Wonder Woman missed an opportunity for true art) by being just so awesome otherwise, but most cannot. Not just movies, of course, Travelers, Broadchurch and The OA were heartbreaking after setting up such an amazing open and middle. I cried for the bad writing like Kevin O’Leary cries for bad money.

And some movies can accidentally become genius – Donnie Darko was home run outstanding, but if you watch the director’s cut, it is horrible trash – it is a miracle that editing turned the dung heap into high art. In fact, Donnie Darko is a study in what to *not* say in a story. Leaving the fundamental "science" of the film hidden resulted in an introspective human story that worked amazingly well.

So, back to Boneeaters. I have noted some rather large changes in my mindset for this story. I want to work these in, and they are a bit dramatic:

So, now back to writing – hopefully this week depending on "real life."

Andrew Zar
October 21, 2017


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